The glory of American style politics and the power of its global businesses and industries is unchallenged. They have yet to act in response to the demand for a strong public investment in mitigating the risks associated with climate change.

The failure to act is not the question, thousands of ideas are flowing in the digital winds, hundreds of ideas are being demonstrated. The current stream of investment is significant but confusing as if a technical “one-off” or strategic “winner” may be at the heart of the problem.  

Without Samon the forest will not flourish. Without the coalescence of tactics specific to every climate region of the earth, the failure will be confirmed by the earth, its rising seas, violent storms, floods, and fires. The choice to select a positive climate future has not been made. The choice is to wait and have it forced upon an unknown, potentially terrifying percentage of the population. Only one choice is rational and humane.

The Green New Deal (GND)

The risk of taking steps toward ideas like the Green New Deal is that it may or may not prevent the displacement of the American worker by the technology needed for success. Only a political risk is implied by this unknown but not taking steps toward resilience is much deadlier. If political representatives are not unwilling to bring America’s climate regions closer to a sustainable future, then the task is simple, find elect leaders that have courage.  This is no ordinary battle. Every representative in the House will be pushed or pulled in this direction through 2020. A rough first draft of the legislative role is a GoogleDoc (here). It outlines the creation of a select committee recently named Crisis Climate Committee.

The goal of the GND is to decarbonize the economy with Keynesian style short term bursts of large scale public investments, coupled with federal employment guarantees. The GND will be implemented as an evidence-based, outcome driven and performance measured process.



The reasons for the New Deal and its development as an idea for its time is well documented by the FDR Library.  The depth of its creativity in the public interest was in response to a complex set of human needs and environmental challenges and opportunities of the time. The library created an Interactive Periodic Table of the New Deal for the study of its history.  

Readers are invited to bring reviews and comment to this site regarding its relevance today. 

1998

The first steps toward a GND as a public initiative requires a big preemptive warlike change in policy. That change is planned to occur for full implementation by 2020. Achieving the goals implied by the implementation of the GND will result in a national, energy-efficient carbon-reducing energy grid built on a massive expansion of renewable power sources with an evidence base built on the current use of and implementation of all known systems designed for the use of renewables.  These sources will define a rate of x% percent per year to establish outcomes to predict the time when 100% of the national power demand is served by renewable sources.

The performance measures of individual renewables will determine future combinations of private and public investments. Specific energy conservation steps will contribute to goal accomplishment implemented through an energy use inventory of all residential and industrial buildings. Steps to ready all buildings for state-of-the-art renewable energy systems will be the measure for reduction levels by climate sectors of the United States as follows:

  1. Climate Sector reports will establish baseline reductions in GHG emissions through manufacturing, agricultural and other industries processes.
  2. Climate Sector reports will define, locate and score specific infrastructure investments for the repair and improvement of the nation’s transportation grid and related infrastructure that yield the highest reduction in GHG emissions.
  3. Climate Sector reports will examine water. Too much or the lack of it is at the center climate change impacts. High priority investments in local-scale agriculture in communities across the country will include infrastructure to ensure universal access to clean water and protection from the damage it can cause.

The goal of decarbonizing the economy will include methods for a GHG drawdown process. Investments in known and proposed measures will define the potential for GHG mitigation. The evidence and performance measures for this determination are abundant.

If an ordinary, albeit intense blog such as the Urbanist (here) can demystify the process, a practical public process can be implemented.

Support for investments in green technology, through industrial, professional and scientific expertise, and in the creation of products and services of a 100% renewable energy economy in the United States reimagines a new theory of “economic base” (Charles Tiebolt). It is worth trillions in global trade volume, if (and this is a big f’n “if,”) a viable and useful understanding of the growth of metropolitan governments occurs and develops in regions throughout the United States (read here from a half-century ago).

The media outlets Vox, The Atlantic, The Intercept, Axios, ProPublica and so on covered the early efforts to create a GND. The field is wide, from its millennial “this changes everything” upstart sunrise movement organizers, to blue wave reps like AOC, and the support of the old, such as Al Gore. Ultimately, the GND is subject to the instincts of Nancy Pelosi where the idea for a GND fell into the lesser priority world of Congress like the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, and one hot button later became the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis headed by Kathy Castor (FL 14th) an unchallenged seven-term representative from Tampa Bay.

Crisis (danger + opportunity)

I don’t know when the idea of global conquest seemed possible, or even thought of as accomplished in the history of power. I do know it as the conscious decision of many actors over four thousand years or so.

The distinct spheres of human decision-making occur through deep social and cultural connections built on a cognitive view of evidence widely shared, but rarely proven.

These views can be right or wrong but consistently perceived correct by the party that holds the view. Think of that sphere as “Pinky”. In another sphere, which I would like you to think of as the “Brain,” are the decisions made in professional silos. As an example, economists will influence decision-making based on combinations of economic factors such as costs or benefits, profits, and losses measured by currency and a period.

Perhaps the most useful decision making sphere is the one that drives for a big transformation.  The impetus is drawn from exposure of incorrect, “Pinky-like” beliefs established by the cultural recurrences of the first sphere.  The stimulus for specific action draws from failures of the second sphere where “The Brain’s” leadership reveals the collapse of traditional practices. Whether the market for these experiences is in currency, ideas or both, the demand for something new and transformative takes hold. The geologist’s understanding of time and the anthropologist examination of humanity have suggested we name this transformation as the Anthropocene.

“the era of geological time during which human activity is considered to be the dominant influence on the environment, climate, and ecology of the earth.” Oxford English Dictionary.

Andrew C. Revkin’s lifetime of reporting produced a perfectly tuned review his global experience as the observer of the growing pains of humanity as follows:


“After tens of thousands of years of scrabbling by, spreading around the planet, and developing tools of increasing sophistication, humans are in surge mode and have only just started to become aware that something profound is going on

Andrew C. Revkin — An Anthropocene Journey.

.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.